• Hop Valley uses malts from all over the world. After choosing a combination based on the style of beer, we mill these grains into the grist case to expose the starch granules.
  • The milled grains are then mixed with hot water to form the mash. This allows enzymes in the malt to convert the starch into sugars.
  • The sweet wort produced from the mash is pumped to the kettle, where the sugars are removed via a healthy spray of hot water.
  • After the wort is separated from it, the spent grain is made available to local farmers as cow feed.

  • The wort is brought to a boil to concentrate it. Hops are then added for bitterness, flavor and aroma.
  • The wort is pumped through a heat exchanger where it is cooled with water, which we will collect and use for our next batch of beer.
  • Once cooled, the wort is pumped into a fermenter that has been pitched with yeast. The yeast ferments the wort, producing alcohol and CO2. Depending on the beer, hops are added at this stage for more flavor and aroma. This is called dry hopping.
  • The beer has now been brewed, but needs proper conditioning to reach full Hop Valley quality. This aging process runs from seven to 28 days.
  • Our beer is finally ready to be distributed to stores, restaurants and bars all over the Northwest, where it can be consumed with much gusto and fanfare by loyal Hop Valley fans and fans to be.
  • Once the carbonation level has been adjusted, the beer is ready to be bottled, canned or kegged.